Women Rule: Great Boss Lady Biographies for Cool Moms and Kids

Women Rule: Great Boss Lady Biographies for Cool Moms and Kids

Somebody somewhere told me it was Temple Grandin's birthday last week and I got immediately excited about 1) Reminding you of this so, so great movie about Grandin (which you can stream for free with Amazon Prime) 2) Sharing the bestselling autobiography about her extraordinary life (and how she got to be a spokesperson for autism), Thinking in Pictures and 3) Updating you on a great children's book (that just came out!) about her.  

And then I started to get obsessed with this idea of reading simultaneous biographies (about badass women) with my kids.  This isn't super realistic, considering that the adult bios will take about 40 times as long, but the CONCEPT!  It's fun, right?  Book twinning!

Since lots of biographies are REAL BAD, I picked the REAL GOOD ones (all are recommended by actual smart people, a few are my faves).  And most of the children's books are ones I use with my students or read to my kids.  

For moms and young readers

JANE GOODALL:  This amazing woman lived alone in the jungle in her 20s and didn't die of fright.  She did other stuff too.  

FRIDA KAHLO: Artist, activist, fashion icon.  One big tragic love story. 

  Read it in high school (nerd alert!)  and loved it then, so it must have been a page-turner.

Read it in high school (nerd alert!) and loved it then, so it must have been a page-turner.

 Ages 5-9

Ages 5-9

  Ages 4-9 , has a real magical quality

Ages 4-9, has a real magical quality

GERTRUDE STEIN: Patron of Picasso, Matisse, T.S. Elliot

MAYA ANGELOU: Poet, Author, Choreographer, Filmmaker, etc., etc.

MALALA YOUSAFZAI:  Activist for girls' education.

For moms and young adult readers.  You can both read these, just buy two copies!  

MARJANE SATRAPI:  Grew up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution, wrote two autobiographical graphic novels about her experience.  

ANNE FRANK: Her diary about hiding during WWII is timeless.  Great conversation starter.

CYNTHIA ANN PARKER, or NADUAH:  Kidnapped by Comanches at a young age and then recaptured by Texas Rangers, she refused to readjust to white society and escaped to return to her Comanche community several times.  She was also the mother of the last Comanche chief, Quanah Parker, which is another fascinating story.  

I'd love to hear any other suggestions!  Please share by commenting below!

 

Cover photo of Joan Didion reading to her daughter, Quintana

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You gotta listen: Vocalo Radio

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