Weekly Culture Roundup: LOLs, Frida Bday, & Near Death Experiences

Weekly Culture Roundup: LOLs, Frida Bday, & Near Death Experiences

Hey mom!  Hope you had a great weekend.  Check out this cool stuff from last week:

Great op ed on laughter in texts.  Turns out, people rarely change the way they text laugh.

When it comes to texts, a ha-space-ha-er does not become a haha-er. An LMAO-er does not become a LOLer,” she said. “So online laughter is very much like a fingerprint, which is actually very much like real life. You recognize people’s laughs.
— Jessica Bennett, New York Times

 I guess I'm an "Ahahah!"-er for life.

July 6th was Frida Kahlo's 110th birthday.  Refinery 29 reran some photos of her clothes and "accessories" that were locked in a bathroom (?!? something's fishy here) until 2015.  She was in a trolly accident that almost killed her when she was a teenager and life was pretty painful after that.  Didn't seem to stop her one bit.  I mean... the woman was literally shattered and gored with a iron pole.  So, then she just does everything the fiercest way possible, including fashion.  She was SERIOUS about fashion.  

Look at this wedge heel she made for her prosthetic leg.  Flawless.

 The bells are my favorite part.  She did NOT enter a room quietly.  

The bells are my favorite part.  She did NOT enter a room quietly.  

And this dress.  She was unapologetic about everything, especially wearing traditional clothes.  Crazy to think she'd hang out in Paris with Elsa Schiaparelli (Chanel contemporary) wearing this!

 Traditional Tehuantepec dress worn by Frida

Traditional Tehuantepec dress worn by Frida

Speaking of near death experiences and superfreak geniuses, this essay by Edwidge Danticat from an upcoming (July 11th) book titled, The Art of Death: Writing the Final Story IS JUST. SO. GOOD.  

Quick synopsis:  After her mother's death, Danticat is obsessed with near death experiences and the notion that she could die in the blink of an eye.  She references Joan Didion's The Year of Magical Thinking (Didion's account of her grief after the death of her husband and daughter in the same year).

Among the first words Didion wrote after her husband died were, “Life changes in the instant.”
The ordinary instant.
”Confronted with sudden disaster,” Didion writes, “we all focus on how unremarkable the circumstances were in which the unthinkable occurred, the clear blue sky from which the plane fell, the routine errand that ended on the shoulder with the car in flames.”
— Edwidge Danticat, The Mysterious Power of Near Death Experiences

The last three paragraphs are sad but hopeful.  In the end, Danticat is consoled in her fear that death will be meaningless by the recollection of a conversation from the novel, The English Patient, by Michael Ondaatje

“It is important to die in holy places,” Almásy thinks, toward the end of the novel. Though sometimes as we walk this earth, with the memories of our loved ones shadowing us, we might also become our own holy places: roaming churches, cathedrals, and memory mausoleums.
— -Edwidge Danticat, The Mysterious Power of Near Death Experiences

Dang!  She's good.  

Ok enough about dying, mom, time for something upbeat... Blue Ivy's freestyle.  

 

 Get it?  UpBEAT? Boom Shakalaka. 

Get it?  UpBEAT? Boom Shakalaka. 

Summer Bevs for Cool Moms

Summer Bevs for Cool Moms

Fashion Friday: Jemima Kirke

Fashion Friday: Jemima Kirke