Weekly Culture Report: Four short tidbits

Weekly Culture Report: Four short tidbits

Happy Thanksgiving week!  

Some good goodies for this short week...

1.  I was excited to hear that a bunch of big time, big time, artists (Yoko Ono, Kara Walker, Mark Dion, and Cauleen Smith, to name a few) got together for this year's Prospect New Orleans.  Over 20 venues house installations and exhibitions of work that speak to the city's dynamic culture.  Follow Prospect_Nola to see all the coolness.  

 A view of Barkley Hendricks' paintings in Prospect NOLA.

A view of Barkley Hendricks' paintings in Prospect NOLA.

2.  I liked learning about how Richard Avedon pushed for equality in the fashion industry and beyond. 

In 1959, when Avedon first photographed China Machado, a Chinese-born, Portuguese-American fashion model — encouraged by Diana Vreeland, the fashion editor of Bazaar — the magazine’s publisher said: “Listen, we can’t publish these pictures. The girl is not white.” Avedon was so angry that he threatened to leave Bazaar. The pictures were published.
— Why Richard Avedon's Work Has Never Been More Relevant, Phillip Gefter, NYTimes, 2017
 China Machado, shot by Avedon, on the cover of Harper's Bazaar, 1959

China Machado, shot by Avedon, on the cover of Harper's Bazaar, 1959

Avedon and James Baldwin were friends in high school and even edited a periodical together called "The Magpie" at DeWitt Clinton High School in NYC.  There's a new show of his work in Chelsea and the NYTimes says he's more relevant than ever.  

3.  Speaking of, I think it's awesome that the NYTimes published another "NYTimes for Kids" this Sunday (the first was in May).  They announced that they will launch a monthly edition starting in January.  I liked "How I became a basketball player" by LeBron James and "12 Movies to see before you turn 13" (Bummer!  These aren't available online!)  

 The second NYTimes for Kids was published last week.

The second NYTimes for Kids was published last week.

And more on kid stuff...

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4.  I loved reading about one of my favorite childhood author/illustrators, Barbara Cooney, and what a radical life she led!  This piece in the Atlantic, father Nathan Perl-Rosenthal writes about her unconventional life and approach to children's literature.  

“It does not hurt them,” Cooney insisted before her audience of senior librarians and educators, to hear about the real stuff of life, about “good and evil, love and hate, life and death.” (She did not say so that evening, but she had already experienced a good bit of each.) She vowed that she would never “talk down to—or draw down to—children.”
— What Would Miss Rumphius Do?, Nathan Perl-Rosenthal, The Atlantic 2017

Her books tell stories of people leading extraordinary, often lonely, lives, but changing the world by following their dreams... Miss Rumphius (1982) is single and lives alone until her death (unusual for a female main character in a children's book).  She brings joy to the world by planting flowers wherever she goes.  Eleanor  tells the story of the sad, solitary, childhood of Eleanor Roosevelt, how she used her pain to become an advocate and ally for the those without a voice.  

 Gotta read this one!

Gotta read this one!

I have a newfound appreciation for Cooney's work and the motivations behind it.  Thanks for speaking your truth, Barbara! 

____

Mom!  Hope your week is short and sweet! 

Soak in all that family love! 

and

Stay Cool.  

Love, Cathleen

 

 

 

 

Cover photo of Zazi, the street performer, by Richard Avedon

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